Stranger Danger

Right away, the cinematography of The Gift implies something is not right with the film’s central couple, Simon and Robyn (Jason Bateman and Rebecca Hall). As Jim Hemphill writes in his review of the film for Paste: [Director Joel] Edgerton’s eerily still and angular compositions, in which Simon and Robyn are repeatedly framed through glass, … Continue reading Stranger Danger

Multiplayer, Multispeaker: How We Talk About Games

As editor of the second edition of “Critical Discourse” for Critical Distance (please hold your applause to the end) on Danger featuring Gita Jackson, Aevee Bee and Nick Dinicola, I was a part of another exciting letter series (“Danger.” Aug 27 2015). I’ve never had any direct contact with Dinicola even though he is a colleague of mine … Continue reading Multiplayer, Multispeaker: How We Talk About Games

Review: Dream

[Originally posted on PopMatters] HyperSloth describes Dream as a “Walking Simulator,” a term that is not one that has been universally adopted among gamers (Stephen Beirne, “Two Minute Game Crit—Walking Simulatores and Phantom Rides”, Normally Rascal. 20 January 2015), but still implies a certain kind of recognizable game. A walking simulator is deliberately slow, and it … Continue reading Review: Dream

Review: Kyn

[Originally posted on PopMatters] As useful as it is to not judge a book by its cover, some covers simply reveal everything there is to know. Take a look at the cover of a Dungeons & Dragons manual and you’ll have a pretty good idea of what to expect out of its contents. Similarly, looking at … Continue reading Review: Kyn

They Think They’re People – Domestication, Wildness and Personified Animals in Breath of Fire

[This piece was written as a part of Critical Distance‘s June 2015 Blogs of the Round Table feature] One day, a hero searching the wilderness (for a meal in a drought? for her missing sister?) stumbles upon a mysterious blue-haired boy. This boy is alien in two ways: he is stark naked and he is completely human. … Continue reading They Think They’re People – Domestication, Wildness and Personified Animals in Breath of Fire